Leonardo da Vinci in Tuscany: in the footsteps of a "genius"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTq131m4sK4 If you want to get off the beaten track and follow in the footsteps of one of Tuscany's most prolific intellectuals, discover our guide to the villages and places that have inspired Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo da Vinci is often regarded as the greatest thinker of his generation and is known and respected by all generations; movies, TV programmes, novels and songs have been dedicated to him repeatedly over the course of history. What made him unique is undoubtedly his remarkable intelligence: his ideas and inventions are still used today and provide a source of inspiration for many contemporary scientists. It is therefore unsurprising that countless admirers seek to trace the locations that made Leonardo who he was and influenced the course of his life. leonardo da vinci Whilst the most commonly known of these links to Leonardo's past is the small town of Vinci (near Florence), in the countryside of Montalbano, there are numerous other places in Tuscany that have shaped the history of the "genius". To begin with, there is Bacchereto, a hamlet near Carmignano (Prato), where Leonardo spent time in the home of his paternal grandmother. Here is where he started to become devoted to the manufacture of ceramics and agriculture, and it is very likely that he also began in this period to take an interest in art and decoration.
Vinci [Photo Credits: Bernd Thaller]
Vinci [Photo Credits: Bernd Thaller]
Another pivotal place for Leonardo's development into brilliance is Anghiari, a beautiful medieval village at the foot of the hills between the Sovara and the Tiber valley. Anghiari is most widely known for having been the backdrop of the famous Battle of Anghiari in the fifteenth century, a battle that was immortalized by Leonardo himself in a mural at the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence. Unfortunately, his work was irretrievably ruined soon after being completed, due to the innovative but disastrous painting method adopted by the artist. Anghiari is well worth the visit, and tourists can admire the Taglieschi Palace, home of the State Museum, and also the “Palace of the Battle. Museum of Memory and Landscape”, which emphasises the depth of the bond between Leonardo and this territory.
Anghiari [Photo Credits: Monica Arellano-Ongpin]
Anghiari [Photo Credits: Monica Arellano-Ongpin]
In the area surrounding Pisa, we can find his traces in Cascina, a city that Leonardo himself indicates as a point of reference in the papers regarding his studies and projects that aimed to deviate the Arno river upstream of Pisa. Leonardo next bought land in Fiesole, something which was inherited after his death by his brothers. In the church of San Domenico di Fiesole there still remains the Baptism of Lorenzo di Credi, which inspired the creation of the Baptism of the Uffizi, a painting attributed to Leonardo himself and also to his master Verrocchio. But it is Florence which truly "sculpted" the artist that we know today: here he observed his father's notary work; he attended the workshops of master Verrocchio; he formed an alliance with the powerful Medici family; here is where his passion for historical Florence football was born.
[Photo Credits: Nove foto da Firenze]
[Photo Credits: Nove foto da Firenze]
Leonardo was also influenced in his work by the town of Piombino, in the province of Livorno. He studied and analysed the place carefully, and recorded his scientific observations meticulously on paper. These surveys allowed Leonardo to broaden his understanding of the movement of wind and waves, as well as the structure of sailboats and navigation techniques. Every trip to Piombino allowed Leonardo to repeatedly enrich his mind and eventually become the man we recognise today as an invaluable and inexhaustible source of inspiration.
Piombino [Photo Credits: Giuseppe Moscato]
Piombino [Photo Credits: Giuseppe Moscato]
  Credits: Original article by Marta Mancini – turismo.intoscana.it