Apuan Alps
panoramaPanoramic views

Monte Pasquilio

A unique landscape from the mountains to the sea

Montignoso

Leaving San Eustachio and Cerreto, following the road immersed in chestnut woods where it is easy to find falcons, buzzards, pheasants and foxes, we arrive at Pasquilio (approx. 800 metres above sea level), a panoramic area from which you can enjoy an unrepeatable landscape that ranges from the sea to the mountains. From Pasquilio the whole Apuoversiliese coast is visible, from Viareggio to the headland of Mount Marcello, the Palmaria Island and, on the most serene and clear days, you can see in the distance the main islands of the Tuscan archipelago and even Corsica. It is a very popular mountain area for excursions and walks.

This area was particularly loved by Enrico Pea, remembered by the citizenship with a marble bust, and by the poets Giuseppe Ungaretti, Eugenio Montale and the painter Mino Maccari. At the shoulders of the Pasquilio the majestic Mount Carchio dominates, once a marble quarry that is today closed but conserve its candid colour. Surrounded by woods of chestnuts and firs is an ideal walking place for those who come looking for a bit of coolness in the hot summer days. In the last World War this hill top was crossed with the Gothic Line, the boundary line between the German troops and the British and American troops, and the background of bloody confrontations that caused many losses both among the local population as among the partisan formations that were set up after 8th September.

Source: Mountain Community of the High Versilia

Carrara
Don't miss Malaspina Castle and the Apuan Alps Park
Carrara has always been considered the city of marble, and for good reason. The identity of this centuries-old city—with strong ties to both the mountains and the nearby Ligurian Sea—has always had marble at its heart: the pristine stone has been extracted from area quarries since Roman times. When you hear or utter “Carrara,” marble and quarries are the immediate associations. ...
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