Villa Orzali
location_cityArchitecture

Villa Orzali in Lucca

The rectangular based building stretches across three floors as well as the cellar and has a hip roof covered with Marseillaise tiles

Lucca

The considerably sized villa is characterised by rigorous symmetry. The main façade on Via Civitali faces east and is accentuated by imitation ashlar which however doesn´t feature on the other facades. On the ground floor of this facade there is a front door and two windows which are framed by concrete fascias. Fascias in which the imitation ashlar is more accentuated than in the rest of the façade run vertically to either side of the windows.
A skirt roof defines the first floor at the level of the ceiling and is interrupted at the centre in alignment with the terrace, which is enclosed by wrought iron railings. Access to the terrace is gained by way of a framed and architraved French door with a depressed arched projecting tympanum. To the sides are two framed windows which are surmounted by a tympanum. To the side of the windows the imitation ashlar fascia continues until it reaches the eaves whilst resuming the motif already featured on the ground floor.
On the second floor three small framed windows are in alignment with those below.
The building is a private property and cannot be visited inside.
Source: Lucca and its lands / www.luccapro.sns.it

Lucca
A bastion-protected medieval city and a blast of comics, culture and colors
Many people born and bred in Tuscany consider Lucca an outlier—it’s not uncommon to hear Florentines mutter “that's not Tuscan”, probably when referring to the bread, which is salted in Lucca and strictly plain elsewhere in Tuscany; or to the Lucchese people's mode of speaking (unique, to say the least); or to the fact that Lucca is the region’s only city-state to have preserved its ...
Morekeyboard_backspace