When is the next solar eclipse (in Italy)

The last total solar eclipse visible from Italy occurred in the twentieth century, on February 15, 1961. The last partial eclipse visible from Italy was on August 11, 1999 as well as the eclipse of October 3, 2005. The next total eclipse visible from Italy will take place on the following dates: • August 2, 2027 • September 3, 2081 After 2081, almost all the eclipses, annular or total, visible from Italy will be visible also from Tuscany. The total eclipses clearly visible from Tuscany will be on: • July 6, 2187 • May 16, 2227 To see these total eclipses we should travel in time, because only the next five or six generations will enjoy this rare celestial show from the vineyards of Chianti or from the crystal clear beaches of the Elba Island. Time travel is still a pipe dream, but also the partial eclipses are fascinating and can offer thrilling moments.
Partial Solar Eclipse as seen from Tuscany [Photo Credits: Matteo Dunchi]
Partial Solar Eclipse as seen from Tuscany [Photo Credits: Matteo Dunchi]
If you want to view a solar eclipse (whether it’s total, annular, or partial), please just remember to never look at the sun with naked eyes or with binoculars and telescopes because it can cause permanent eye damage or even blindness. Looking through sunglasses, clouds or exposed photographic films will not protect you. So, how can you watch a solar eclipse safely? • Make an pinhole projector! Take two pieces of card and punch a small hole in one of them. Tilt the card with the hole towards the sun and use it to project the image of the eclipse onto the second card, or, if you are outside, you can project the image on the ground. This is the most simple, safe and cheap way to view an eclipse, you just need to buy a poster paper. • Use welder's glass or buy proper solar filters #14 or darker. Shade number 14 is one of the most affordable and widely available filters you can use to observe the sun during the eclipse. • Join local viewing at astronomy club, park or nature center. There are telescopes and binoculars that come with built-in solar filters, but they are very expensive. If you watch this unique event with astronomers, you’ll have fun and you'll learn more the eclipse.

The Solar Eclipse 2015 as seen from Tuscany

If you are wondering how Tuscans observe an eclipse or how the solar eclipse has been seen from Tuscany, this photo gallery is for you! We have collected the best pictures to show you the eclipse event as seen from Tuscany. Our office is located in Florence city centre, so we decide to witness the eclipse in the Cathedral Square, just in front of the Duomo, watching the watchers of the solar eclipse...
[Photo Credits: Kinzica Sorrenti - Tuscany Social Media Team]
[Photo Credits: Kinzica Sorrenti - Tuscany Social Media Team]
 ...and making some photographic experiments:
The partial solar eclipse and the Florence cathedral [Photo Credits: Lara Musa - Tuscany Social Media Team]
The partial solar eclipse and the Florence cathedral [Photo Credits: Lara Musa - Tuscany Social Media Team]
In the historic centre of Massa, Tuscany, the eclipse was celebrated in a big way: thanks to the presence of the GAM (Amateur Astronomers Club of Massa), the proper telescopes and solar eclipse glasses were available to everyone in Aranci square:
Piazza Aranci full of people [Photo Credits: Francesco Bini]
Piazza Aranci full of people [Photo Credits: Francesco Bini]
Pinhole tube: can you spot the Sun slice? [Photo Credits: Francesco Bini]
Pinhole tube: can you spot the Sun slice? [Photo Credits: Francesco Bini]
Natural pinholes are created by the gaps between tree leaves and create the crescent shapes on the ground or adjacent walls [Photo Credits: Francesco Bini]
Natural pinholes are created by the gaps between tree leaves and create the crescent shapes on the ground or adjacent walls [Photo Credits: Francesco Bini]
But the funniest picture has been taken in front of "Antica Macelleria Cecchini" in Panzano town. Dario Cecchini, a very famous butcher, wonderfully epitomizes the pranksters souls of the Tuscans: