Tuscany in tilt-shift: Macchiaioli paintings

Recently we saw a photo album of Van Gogh paintings rendered in "tilt-shift", a camera technique that applies selective focus and that has recently been used a lot to make city scenes look like miniatures. Van Gogh looks very pretty rendered in this technique and we wanted to do one too. Here in Tuscany we have a home-grown artistic movement that lends itself rather well, too: The Macchiaioli was a group of painters active in Florence and Tuscany from 1840-70. A truly local movement, they precede the Impressionists and developed a lot of similar values related to capturing light through blotches of paint. The main artists of this movement are: Giovanni Fattori, Silvestro Lega, Telemaco Signorini, Adriano Cecioni, Odoardo Borrani, Giovanni Boldini, Giuseppe Abbati and Raffaello Sernesi. For the first time since the Renaissance, these Italian painters abandoned chiaroscuro and traditional perspective techniques. So if we add a little perspective to the Macchiaioli? :-) Fattori-soldiers_tilt Giovanni Fattori, The Italian Camp at the Battle of Magenta, 1859 Silvestro_Lega_001_tilt Silvestro Lega, Il Pergolato, 1866 (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano) fattori_tilt Giovanno Fattori (Livorno 1825 - Firenze 1908, La diligenza a Sesto , circa 1872 – 1873 (Riccardo Molo collection, source) soldier-white-wall-tilted Giovanni Fattori In vedetta (also known as Il muro bianco), 1872, Private collection macchiaioli_tilt tivoli-serafino-a-pasture-tilt If you love these paintings, you should know that the exhibit Macchiaioli in Montepulciano has been extended through March 31 2011 so you're still in time to go see some of these beauties in person.