Save the dates. It’s a year of art in Florence!

The Superintendent of Florence’s museums has presented “UN ANNO AD ARTE” (A YEAR OF ART): a vast program of temporary exhibitions that will be held by the Polo Museale Fiorentino’s museums –Uffizi, Accademia Gallery, Bargello Museum and the Pitti Palace’s Palatine Gallery, Silver Museum and Modern Art Gallery – has in fact reached its eighth edition. Eight temporary exhibitions not to be missed. So here is what, where and when. 1 – Gherardo delle Notti. Most bizarre paintings and merry suppers. – Uffizi Gallery (February 10 – May 24) Gerrit van Honthorst (1592-1656) is known as Gherardo delle Notti (Gerrit of the Nights) due to his glowing nocturnal scenes. He lived in Italy for almost ten years; here he subscribed almost immediately to Caravaggio's revolution and later became a leading light in the world of painting himself. One of his “fans” was Grand Duke Cosimo II of Tuscany, which is one of the reasons why today in Florence we can admire some wonderful paintings by Gherardo delle Notti. This year, for the first time, a monographic exhibition will be devoted to this great artist, displaying almost all of his Italian paintings, along with a selection of other pictures painted by the artist in Holland.
Gherardo delle Notti, Dinner with lute player
Gherardo delle Notti, Dinner with lute player
2 – The Middle Ages on the Road. – Bargello National Museum (March 20 – June 21) Works of art offer us numerous clues regarding travel in the Middle Ages. This exhibition is divided into five sections: Depicting the World (a selection of 12th to 15th century maps and plans and the earliest celestial sphere still in existence); Saving the Soul: Pilgrims, Preachers and Clerics (to illustrate the different types of people who went on pilgrimages in the Middle Ages); Travelling to War: Crusades, Knights and Military Expeditions (the theme of war is explored with first-hand evidence of Crusader travel); Travelling for Business: Merchants, Bankers and Messengers (the various kinds of "business" trip commonly made in the Middle Ages); Travelling for Show: Itinerant Courts (even travelling only a short distance could count as a journey in a symbolic sense). The exhibition marks the 150th anniversary of Florence as the capital of Italy and of the Bargello's foundation. 3 – Franciscan Art. Masterpieces of art and Asian lands from the 13th to the 15th centuries. – Accademia Gallery (March 30 – October 11) An exhibition sets out to illustrate the flowering of art – painting, sculpture and the sumptuary arts – directly related to the Franciscan movement between the 13th and the 15th centuries and to highlight the Franciscans' achievement in spreading the gospel throughout Asia. 4 – Lapis Lazuli. Blue Magic. – Silver Museum, Pitti Palace (June 9 – October 11) The first exhibition ever devoted specifically to lapis lazuli - a rock made up of a variety of different minerals - and its use in science and in the arts from the earliest times to our own day. A section of the exhibition is devoted to the use of lapis lazuli in painting. 5 – Piero di Cosimo (1462–1522). An eccentric "Florentine" painter from the Renaissance to the Modern Manner. – Uffizi Gallery (June 22 – September 27) Piero di Cosimo: an eccentric genius of the Florentine Renaissance, but a little-known figure despite the critics' appreciation and the long list of paintings attributed to him in museums and collections throughout the world. This is the first monographic retrospective ever devoted to him, alongside a select group of paintings by contemporary artists such as Filippino Lippi, Lorenzo di Credi, the Master of Serumido, Cosimo Rosselli and Fra Bartolomeo. It will be comprised of one hundred works in all.
Piero di Cosimo, Liberation of Andromeda
Piero di Cosimo, Liberation of Andromeda
6 – Carlo Dolci. – Palatina Gallery, Pitti Palace (June 30 – November 15) A celebration of the artistic genius of Carlo Dolci (1616–87), the most important Florentine painter of the 17th century, appreciated even in his own day for his unique style imbued with a kind of "magical realism" and a mastery of the depiction of nature bordering on Hyperrealism. 7 – Florence, Capital City 1865–2015. The king's gifts and collections. – Modern Art Gallery, Pitti Palace (November 19, 2015 – April 3, 2016) When the capital of Italy moved from Turin to Florence, king Victor Emmanuel II sought to turn Palazzo Pitti into a living testimony to his taste in furniture and interior design. So, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Florence as the capital of Italy, this exhibition focuses on the works of art that the king collected and subsequently donated to Palazzo Pitti. The areas chosen to hold the exhibition are the Ballroom in the Winter Apartments and the Music Room, both of which are part of the area known at the time as the "Apartment of His Majesty the King" and today as the Apartment of the Duchess of Aosta. This area will be open to the public in its entirety throughout the celebrations. 8 – Carlo Portelli. A painter of some worth. – Accademia Gallery (December 14, 2015 – April 17, 2016) Despite the fact that his masterpiece hangs in the Accademia Gallery's David Tribune - the Immaculate Conception – Carlo Portelli's work has never received the critical acclaim that it deserves. This exhibition comprises all of the pictures that can be reliably attributed to Portelli: some fifty paintings, drawings and documents.