Florence's Historic Cafes

The city's historic cafes are a key player in Florence's most recent history: literary circles, artistic movements, and great poetry were born around the tables of these cafes which gave rise to inspiration, collaboration and intellectual debate.  Today these cafes are key stops for visitors that want to truly understand Florence in all its aspects.  
Firenze [Photo credits: Kirsi L-M]
Firenze [Photo credits: Kirsi L-M]

Caffé Bianchi

Opened by Pasquale Bianchi in 1920 as a mixed business which sold tobacco, pharmaceuticals, liquors and coffee at Piazza S. Felice, 8r. In 1929 his son Bruno moved the business a few doors up the road to No. 5r adding wine and pastries to the other products on sale, and upgrading the furnishings, many of which are conserved to this day. The new location even roasted its own beans, filling the neighbourhood with its aroma. In the 1960s Bruno's son  Luciano took over the business which he runs to this day along with his son Jacopo. Piazza San Felice, 5/r Ph: +39 055 224406
[Photo credits: Hari Seldon]
[Photo credits: Hari Seldon]

Caffé Concerto Paszkowski

First opened in 1846 as Caffè Centrale, it passed in 1904 to the ownership of the Polish Paskowski family which turned it in to a birreria. In the first decades of the 20th century it became a meeting spot for the scholars and artists who were involved with the La Voce, Lacerba and Il Selvaggio magazines. In 1947, in the years after the war, the design was modernized and it became a favourite spot of the intellectual class, like the poets of the Hermetic movement. Today Paszkowski is still one of Florence's most elegant cafes, known internationally for its evening music concerts. Piazza d. Repubblica, 31-35/r Ph: +39 055 210236

Caffé Latteria Caffellatte

Opened in 1920 as a milk shop authorized to "mix coffee and milk" in a former butcher shop from 1840. The shelves, hooks, counter and marble walls and floor all date from the original butchery. In 1984 a new owner, Vanna Casati, began serving classic Italian breakfast with bowls of cafe latte, bread, butter, marmalade and homemade cakes and pastries. Today the cafe is still the local milk shop, but has also become a destination for many, including students and faculty from the nearby Department of Literature, thanks to its excellent organic, vegetarian products and lovely atmosphere Via degli Alfani, 39/r Ph: +39 055 2478878

Caffé Giubbe Rosse

Founded as the “Birreria F.lli Reininghaus” in 1847, the Giubbe Rosse soon became a meeting point for the German community in Florence, while the Florentines took to calling it the "giubbe rosse" (or "red jackets") thanks to the odd uniform of the waiters. The international atmosphere, including newspapers which were available for browsing, soon attracted the young intellectuals of Florence who created a literary magazines and artistic movements in its rooms. Among its regular visitors were Papini, Soffici, Palazzeschi, Gadda, Gatto, Pratolini, Vittorini, and Montale. Piazza della Repubblica, 13/r Ph: +39 055 212280  
[Photo credits: Andreas Jungherr]
[Photo credits: Andreas Jungherr]

Gilli

In 1733 the Swiss Gilli family opened "The Sweet Bread Shop" in Via Calzaiuoli, moving to Via degli Speziali in 1860. In 1890 the cafe was taken over by another Swiss family, the Frizzoni. In the 1920s the cafe was moved to its current location and became the meeting spot for the period's artists, including Marinetti, Soffici, Boccioni, Carrà and Palazzeschi. The furniture and decorations, still perfect, date to this time and Gilli is the only example of a Belle-Époque cafe still around in Florence. Piazza d. Repubblica, 36-39/r Ph: +39 055 213896

Pasticceria Bar Ruggini

Giuseppe Ruggini began making biscuits and fresh pastries in Via de' Neri in 1914 and his buisness quickly became one of the most popular in Florence. His skill and passion were passed from father to son down to Riccardi, the third Ruggini pastry-maker who still offers fresh-baked pastries, refined pralines and chocolates to his customers every day. The business was enlarged in 1989 and is in a historic building which is covered in a single brick vault. Via dei Neri 76/r Ph: +39 055 214521
[Photo credits: Miles Berry]
[Photo credits: Miles Berry]

Rivoire

Enrico Rivoire, Torinese Royal chocolatier, opened his chocolate factory here in 1872. This is where Florentines first learned how to taste chocolates and eat the traditional Savoy "chocolate in a cup." The shop quickly became famous, thanks not just to its excellent chocolates but also to its premiere location. In 1977 Rivoire passed into the hands of the Bardelli brothers, maintaining all of the artisan charecteristics which characterised its production: from the toasting of the cacao beans to the creation of their products. The chocolatiers offer a variety of specialties made from original recipes with a high percentage of cacao guaranteed. The early 20th-century furnishings are beautiful, but are nothing to compare with the experience of eating one of their excellent chocolates at a table in front of a sunset-tinted Palazzo della Signoria. Piazza della Signoria, 5/r Ph: +39 055 214412

Robiglio

The Piemontese Knight, Pietro Robiglio, after experience as a baker and pastry chef in Milan and Verona, opened his first shop in Florence in 1928, quickly attracting a refined and loyal clientele. His son, Pier Luigi, maintained the original artisanal mark of the products and Pietro's grandson, Edoardo, continued the family tradition. Today Robiglio is a modern pastry store where, to this day, it is still possible to taste the specialties of the past: the "Torta Campagnola," the "Fruttodoro" and the "Gallette al latte." Some of the original design has been reconstructed based on the originals which were damaged in the 1966 flood. Via dei Servi 112/r Ph: +39 055 212784 Source: www.turismo.intoscana.it Visualizza Florence's Historic Cafes in una mappa di dimensioni maggiori