An original Tuscany. A twentieth-century Tuscany.

Exhibitions, concerts, theater, events, itineraries, 109 museums involved, a dedicated app: this is “Toscana '900”, six months (June-December) dedicated to discovering a century of extraordinary art, revealing an unusual Tuscany (because… it’s not always all about Renaissance!). You can find all the info on www.Toscana900.com We’ll take a quick look at three of the seven itineraries suggested by Toscana ’900. LIAISONS: THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND THE ANCIENT WORLD Right in the “cradle of the Renaissance”, take a twentieth century art journey in Florence! Starting from the Gallery of Modern Art in Palazzo Pitti and the final part of the Vasari Corridor, where 130 self-portraits of Italian and foreign artists of the '900 have been on display since 2013, the path takes us to the ground floor of the Uffizi Gallery: the three rooms of San Pier Scheraggio host Alberto Burri’s duo-tone Bianco Nero (above the entrance to what used to be the central nave of the church), the great battles of the Risorgimento painted by Cagli and Gattuso, and a re-meditation on the ancient mythologies by Marini and Venturi. Next, jump over to the Bargello National Museum, where the ancient collections are enriched by contemporary donations, and to the Marino Marini Museum, where modern sculptures interact with a Renaissance jewel by Leon Battista Alberti.
Marino Marini Museum, Florence
Marino Marini Museum, Florence
Villa Bardini is home to artworks by Pietro Annigoni, which are immersed in a Renaissance-inspired atmosphere. Also pay a visit to Il Bisonte gallery (Via San Niccolo 24/r), a place that attracted international artists in the decades after the Second World War by teaching classical techniques. Then enjoy Florence from above while admiring the sculptures that Folon left to the city, which are now placed throughout the Rose Garden, a few steps under Piazzale Michelangelo. Finally, of course, the Museo Novecento: a new museum in town entirely dedicated to the twentieth century.
Museo Novecento, Florence
Museo Novecento, Florence
PARKS AND ENVIRONMENTAL ART IN SOUTHERN TUSCANY Tuscany is a place where the landscape has always inspired artists, and where today we can enjoy art even while walking in a park: in Tuscany you’ll find some of the most important works and art collections en plein-air in all of Italy, created in the second half of the 20th century and acknowledged as international benchmarks. Each art-park has its own history and peculiarities. Some places stand out as founders of ‘environmental art,’ like the Art Spaces of Celle, from the ‘80s, based on an absolute synergy between art and landscape, thanks to the vision of the collector Giuliano Gori. The Southern part of Tuscany is particularly rich from this point of view. Here you’ll find the unbelievable Tarots Garden by Niki de Saint Phalle and the Garden of Daniel Spoerri, on the slopes of Mount Amiata, as well as more recent ones like the Garden of Sounds by Paul Fuchs and the Giardino di Non Ritorno (Garden of No Return) by Rodolfo Lacquaniti. Other parks have arisen in the heart of Tuscany in recent years: Poggio Valicaia in Scandicci (Florence), Padula Park (Carrara), Villa Magia (Quarrata), the Castle of Santa Maria Novella near Certaldo and the Chianti Sculpture Park.
Daniel Spoerri Garden, Seggiano
Daniel Spoerri Garden, Seggiano
FASHION AND DESIGN MUSEUMS Surely fashion is now considered part of art history, and this is particularly obvious in Italy and in Florence, where fashion is linked to artisan traditions and is an expression of the culture and creativity of context. What you may not know is that conventionally the birth and recognition of Italian fashion in the world can be traced back to the fashion parade organized in 1951 by Giovan Battista Giorgini in the Sala Bianca (White Room) of Palazzo Pitti in Florence. The itinerary suggested by Toscana ‘900 invites you to visit the Costume Gallery of Palazzo Pitti, the Gucci Museum, the Capucci Museum and the Ferragamo Museum in Florence, the Textile Museum in Prato and the Piaggio Museum in Pontedera dedicated to the Vespa: a symbol and universal icon for many generations, a celebration of Tuscan creativity!