2014 in Florence? A year of art!

The Superintendent of Florence’s museums has presented “UN ANNO AD ARTE” (A YEAR OF ART), an event that has become a tradition! This vast program of temporary exhibitions that will be held by the Polo Museale Fiorentino’s museums – Uffizi, Accademia Gallery, Bargello Museum and the Pitti Palace’s Palatine Gallery, Silver Museum and Modern Art Gallery - has in fact reached its eighth edition. From spring to the end of the year. Nine temporary exhibitions to keep you entertained. Nine! And you shouldn’t miss a single one! So grab your diary and mark the dates, names and places! (And this year, to help you out, there is also the “Un Anno ad Arte app”) 1 – Once in a lifetime. Treasures from the archives and libraries of Florence – Palatine Gallery, Pitti Palace (January 28 – April 27) Three archival documents of Michelangelo, a drawing by Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci's birth certificate, a written lesson by Galileo about Dante's Hell, the law of Peter Leopold of Lorraine that abolished the death penalty in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany in 1786, as well as works and writings by Savonarola, Cosimo I de 'Medici, Ugo Foscolo, Peter Vieusseux, Vasco Pratolini and many others. The exhibition, which opens the program "A Year of Art", includes 133 pieces - manuscripts, books and drawings: a selection of paper treasures, some of which have never been shown to the public. A section will be dedicated to the consequences suffered by Florentine papers and books in two dramatic moments of the city's history: the 1966 flood and the bomb of 1993. 2 – The rooms of the muse. Baroque paintings from the collection of Francesco Molinari Pradelli - Uffizi Gallery (February 11 – May 11) The collection of the orchestra leader Francesco Molinari Pradelli, put together over the course of his travels around the world, is known internationally: from nineteenth-century to Baroque paintings. The exhibition is a selection of 100 paintings, chosen from among the 200 comprising the collection. 3 – Recognize Michelangelo. The sculpture of Buonarroti in photography and painting from the nineteenth century to today – Accademia Gallery (February 18 – May 18) On the occasion of the 450-year celebrations since the death of Michelangelo Buonarroti, this exhibition aims to highlight the role that photography has played in consolidating the critical acclaim and iconography of Michelangelo and, through it, the celebration of his myth.
[Renato Sansaini, Michelangelo: La Pietà (particolare), Firenze, Collezione Ferruccio Malandrin]
[Renato Sansaini, Michelangelo: La Pietà (particolare), Firenze, Collezione Ferruccio Malandrin]
4 – Baccio Bandinelli sculptor and teacher (1493-1560) – Bargello National Museum (April 9 – July 13) Baccio Bandinelli, judged by Vasari (his arch-enemy!) to be an "artist of eternal fame", is celebrated by this exhibition, after nearly two centuries of ostracism by the critics, while in the Baroque period and throughout Neoclassicism, Bandinelli, like Michelangelo, was considered the greatest sculptor of his age and, in the sixteenth century, he was definitely the most important figure for Florentine sculpture. The exhibition will present sculptures and paintings, drawings and prints, bronzes, medals and a rare wax model from Montpellier.
[Scuola di Andrea del Sarto, Ritratto di Bandinelli giovane, Firenze, Galleria degli Uffizi]
[Scuola di Andrea del Sarto, Ritratto di Bandinelli giovane, Firenze, Galleria degli Uffizi]
5 – Sacred splendours. The treasure of the “chapel of the relics” in the Pitti Palace – Silver Museum, Pitti Palace (May 20 – September 28) In 1616, in the Pitti Palace, the 'Chapel of the Relics' was consecrated with a solemn ceremony, built by Cosimo I and a symbol of the devotion of the Grand Duchess of Tuscany and of the last Medici grand dukes. This octagonal chapel has been used to store precious reliquaries: in just a few years, extraordinary art works were gathered here, which were further increased to become one of the largest sacred treasures in Europe. 6 – Jacopo Ligozzi “super-universal painter” (Verona 1547 – Florence 1627) – Palatine Gallery, Pitti Palace (May 27 – September 28) An exhibition dedicated to the painter Jacopo Ligozzi, born in Verona in 1547 but soon moved to Florence (in 1577, his presence is documented at the grand-ducal court of Francis I), where he remained until his death. The exhibition presents the painter's activity for the first time in a systematic way, highlighting the various fields in which he had to act and his multi-faceted and versatile appearance on the Florence scene. 7 – Pure, simple and natural in the art in Florence between fifth and seventeenth – Uffizi Gallery, Pitti Palace (June 17 – November 2) A rich and tight counterpoint between painting and sculpture, divided into nine sections comprising about 80 works and 35 artists.
[Andrea del Sarto, Annunciazione, Firenze, Galleria Palatina]
[Andrea del Sarto, Annunciazione, Firenze, Galleria Palatina]
8 – "The luck of the primitives". Art treasures from the Italian collections between eighteenth and nineteenth centuries – Accademia Gallery (June 24 – December 8) The exhibition aims to offer a critical-bibliographical contribution to this important cultural phenomenon concerning the history of taste and collecting in Italy, between the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century. A phenomenon that also had a significant and direct influence on the development of the large public art collections in the European countries. 9 – "Lights on the twentieth century”, a preparation test for the future of the Modern Art Gallery of Palazzo Pitti – Modern Art Gallery, Pitti Palace (September 30 – January 11, 2015) The celebration of the centenary of the first section dedicated to modern art (1914) is being celebrated with an exhibition dedicated to the twentieth century. But it will be more than an exhibition, it will be the idea of a museum of masterpieces - so far kept in storage at the Modern Art Gallery - which we hope will become a permanent feature in the rooms on the top floor, giving life to the first Florentine museum dedicated to the Italian twentieth century.