Villino Jole oggi Macchia
location_cityArchitecture

Villino Jole (today Villino Macchia) in Lucca

The little villa was built on Lorenzo Martinelli´s property by his son-in-law, engineer Arturo Caprotti, who married his daughter Jole in 1910

Lucca

The house was supposed to be used as the couple’s residence in Lucca. Infact Caprotti and his family, who were originally from Cremona, had moved to Villa Farneta, formerly Guinigi, at the beginning of the Century,
The architecture of the villa which consists of two floors and picks up on some elements which had already been used by the designer while building Villa Giomi in Via Civitali for his cousins.
The external part of the building is principally characterised by the veranda which is crowned with a terrace. Inside, a stairway prolongs the external stair which acts as a link between the cubic part of the villa and the veranda. The latter features numerous decorations in concrete which form fasces with flowers and leaves and checked motifs while the balustrade features motifs in the shape of flower vases.
The painted decoration on the eaves fascia features convolvuli and roses in bright colours. The garden of the villa is very small in size given that it was integrated into Caprotti´s father-in-law´s property, benefiting from the grounds surrounding Villa Martinelli, which are now separated by Via Paganini.
The building is private property and cannot be visited inside.
Source: Lucca and its lands / www.luccapro.sns.it

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Many people born and bred in Tuscany consider Lucca an outlier—it’s not uncommon to hear Florentines mutter “that's not Tuscan”, probably when referring to the bread, which is salted in Lucca and strictly plain elsewhere in Tuscany; or to the Lucchese people's mode of speaking (unique, to say the least); or to the fact that Lucca is the region’s only city-state to have preserved its ...
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