Villa Marraccini
location_cityArchitecture

Villa Marraccini in Lucca

The rectangular based building consists of a main floor, a cellar and an attic. It has a hip roof which is covered with a layer of Marseillaise roofing tiles

Via Fabio Filzi, 12-44

Along half the length of the façade there is a veranda which is enclosed by a stone-built parapet and wrought iron panels which form floral motifs. Access to the veranda is gained by way of a marble staircase with bolted wrought iron banisters. The fascias which form the architrave of the projecting glass roof are also made of cast iron and are supported by small iron columns.
Below the veranda, two archways lead to the cellar. The windows on all the facades of the main floor, with the exception of the rear, have slightly projecting architraves which are surmounted by depressed arch shaped fascias with concrete faces on either side. Below each window two corbels are brought together with a floral festoon.
A thin cornice runs along all the facades between the main floor and the attic; plaster fascias which run alongside the attic windows start off here and come to an end when they reach the corbels below the eaves.
The corners of the building are defined by pilasters which reach the height of the cornice which runs between the mezzanine floor and the attic, half way up they are decorated with garlands which are supported by a fascia which bears the initials Z.M.
The building is a private property and cannot be visited inside.
Source: Lucca and its lands / www.luccapro.sns.it

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